Removal of the Relics of Ignatius the God-bearer

Removal of the Relics of Ignatius the God-bearer

Saint Ignatius was a disciple of Saint John the Theologian, and a successor of the Apostles, and he became the second Bishop of Antioch, after Evodus. He wrote many epistles to the faithful, strengthening them in their confession, and preserving for us the teachings of the holy Apostles. Brought to Rome under Trajan, he was surrendered to lions to be eaten, and so finished the course of martyrdom about the year 107. The remnants of his bones were carefully gathered by the faithful and brought to Antioch. He is called God-bearer, as one who bare God within himself and was aflame in heart with love for Him. Therefore, in his Epistle to the Romans (ch. 4), imploring their love not to attempt to deliver him from his longed-for martyrdom, he said, "I am the wheat of God, and am ground by the teeth of the wild beasts, that I may be found to be the pure bread of God." Saint John Chrysostom has a homily in honour of the translation of the Saint's relics (PG 50:587).

29 january: Martyr Chryse (c. 41-54); Martyrs Sarbelus (Thathuil) and his sister Bebaia, of Edessa (110); Saint Barsimaeus the Confessor, Hieromartyr Bishop of Edessa (114); The Holy Seven Martyrs of Samosata (297): Romanus, James, Philotheus, Hyperechius, Abibus, Julian, and Paregorius; Hieromartyrs Silvanus, Bishop of Emesa, Luke the Deacon, and Mocius the Reader (312); Venerable Aphrahates the Persian, Hermit of Antioch (370); Venerable Ascepsimus, monk; Saint Ashot Kuropalates of Tao-Klarjeti, Georgia (829) (see also January 27) Saint Caesarius, a deacon in Angoulême in France under its first bishop St Ausonius (1st century); Hieromartyr Constantius of Perugia, first Bishop of Perugia, and Companions (170); Martyr Sabinian of Troyes (275); Martyrs Papias and Maurus, soldiers martyred in Rome under Maximian (ca. 303); Saint Valerius, second Bishop of Trier in Germany (c. 320); Saint Blath (Flora), a cook at St Brigid's convent in Kildare where she was honoured as a holy woman (523); Saint Gildas the Wise, Abbot of Rhuys, Brittany (c. 570); Saint Severus (Sulpitius I of Bourges, Sulpicius Severus), Bishop of Bourges (591); Saint Dallán Forgaill (of Cluain Dallain), a relative of St Aidan of Ferns, martyred at Inis-coel by pirates (598); Saint Aquilinus of Mediolanum (Milan), martyred by the Arians (650); Saint Voloc, a bishop from Ireland who worked in Scotland (c. 724); Venerable Ignatios the Sinaite, of Rethymno, Crete; Venerable Laurence, recluse of the Kiev Caves and Bishop of Turov (1194); Saint Ignatius, Wonder-worker and Bishop of Smolensk (1210); Saint Andrei Rublev, iconographer, of the Spaso-Andronikov Monastery, Moscow (1430) (see also July 4); Saints Gerasimus (1441), Pitirim (1455), and Jonah (1470), Bishops of Perm; New Martyr Demetrius of Chios, at Constantinople (1802); New Hieromartyrs John Granitovo and Leontius Klimenko, Priests, Constantine Zverev, Deacon, and with them 5 Martyrs (1920); Other Commemorations: Translation of the relics (5th century) of Hieromartyr Ignatius the God-bearer, Bishop of Antioch (107); Synaxis of All Saints of Yekaterinburg.

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