Saint Xenophon

Saint Xenophon

Xenophon, his spouse Mary and their sons Arkadios and John, were noted citizens of Constantinople and lived in the fifth century. Despite riches and position, they distinguished themselves by their simplicity of soul and goodness of heart. Wishing to give their sons John and Arkadios a more complete education, they sent them off to the Phoenician city of Beirut. Through Divine Providence the ship on which both brothers sailed became ship-wrecked. The brothers were pitched by the waves onto shore at different places. Aggrieved at being separated, the brothers dedicated themselves to God and accepted monasticism. For a long time the parents received no news about their children and presumed them to have perished. Xenophon, however, now already quite old, maintained firm hope in the Lord and consoled his wife Mary, telling her not to sorrow but to believe that their children were watched over by the Lord. After several years the spouses made pilgrimage to the Holy places and at Jerusalem they met their sons, pursuing asceticism at different monasteries. The joyful parents gave thanks to the Lord for providently re-uniting the whole family. For the remainder of their lives, the monastics Xenophon and Mary dedicated themselves to God and accepted monasticism. The monks Arkadios and John, having taken leave of their parents, went out into the wilderness, where after long ascetic toil they were glorified by gifts of wonderworking and perspicacity. The monastic elders Xenophon and Maria, having pursued asceticism in silence and strict fasting, also received of God the gift of wonderworking.

26 january: Martyrs Ananias the priest, Peter the prison guard, and seven soldiers, in Phoenicia (295); The Holy Two Martys of Phrygia; Venerable Ammon of Egypt (350), disciple of St. Anthony the Great (see also January 10 and December 7); Venerable Symeon "the Ancient" of Mount Sinai (c. 390); Saint Paula of Rome (Paula of Palestine), monastic foundress in Palestine (404); Venerable Gabriel, Abbot of the monastery of Saint Stephanos in Jerusalem (c. 490); Venerable Xenophon and his wife St. Mary, and their two sons Sts. Arcadius and John, of Constantinople (6th century); Saint Conon, Bishop and monastic founder on the Isle of Man (648); Saint Theofrid (Theofroy), a monk at Luxeuil in France who became Abbot of Corbie, and a Bishop (c. 690); Saint Athanasius, honoured as a bishop in Sorrento in the south of Italy; Saint Alphonsus of Astorga, Bishop of Astorga in Spain (9th century); Saint Ansurius (Aduri, Asurius, Isauri), Bishop of Orense in Galicia (925); Venerable Clement of Mt. Sagmation (1111); Saint David the Builder (David III), King of Georgia (1125); Venerable Xenophon of Robeika, Abbot of Robeika, Novgorod (1262); Venerable Arcadius of Vyaznikovsky (1592); New Martyr Matushka Maria of Gatchina (1930); New Hieromartyr Cyril, Metropolitan of Kazan (1937); New Hieromartyr Arcadius (1938); Martyr John Popov (1938); Other Commemorations: Commemoration of the Great Earthquake at Constantinople (447-448), during the reign of Emperor Theodosius II (r. 408–450); Translation of the relics (845) of Sts. Theodore the Confessor, Abbot of the Studion Monastery (826), and his brother Joseph the Confessor (Joseph of Thessalonica), Archbishop of Thessalonica (832); Repose of Metropolitan Gabriel (Petrov) of Novgorod and St. Petersburg (1801); Repose of Metropolitan Joseph (Naniescu) of Suceava, Romania (1902).

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